malware - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • Symantec looks to protect users from mutating malware

    Symantec today announced the 12th edition of its flagship enterprise desktop anti-malware product, Symantec Endpoint Protection, that looks to go beyond traditional anti-virus signatures to use a cloud-based file-identification system to protect users from virus mutations.

  • NetClarity goes after rogue devices weaseling in on corporate nets

    NetClarity is introducing a new generation of its <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/reviews/2010/062110-network-access-control-test-access.html">NAC gear</a> called Second Generation NAC which lets customers inventory and fingerprint network devices and using heuristics to identify possible malware activity.

  • Night Dragon brings security vulnerabilities into boardroom

    A hacking operation dubbed 'Night Dragon' has targeted energy organisations, using tried-and-tested intrusion methods to steal intellectual property related to oil field exploration and bidding plans, according to security company, McAfee.

  • What is an 'Advanced Persistent Threat,' anyway?

    "Beware the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Persistent_Threat">Advanced Persistent Threat</a>"! is the <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/topics/security.html">security</a> vendor <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/who-wants-be-cyber-security-warrior?ap1=rcb">mantra of the moment</a>. But really, what is an APT? Depends who you ask ...

  • Trend Micro releases free Stuxnet detection tool

    Trend Micro has released a tool that administrators can use to scan dozens of computers at a time for Stuxnet, the malicious software program that has raised widespread concern for its targeting of industrial systems made by Siemens.

  • New malware technique targets intrusion-prevention systems

    A recently discovered category of malware -- advanced evasion techniques -- can sneak through most intrusion-prevention systems to deliver even well-known exploits such as Sasser and Conficker to targeted machines without leaving a trace of how they got there, researchers say.

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